Kidney Disease 101 – Kidney Disease Natural Treatment Options

Each of our kidneys perform 3 basic functions, Eliminate via the passing of urine the waste materials of metabolism or functioning of the body. In other words, eliminate toxic substances such as urea and creatinine that the body no longer needs.

Regulate the balance between sodium and water in the body and control the attentiveness of many other debris such as potassium, calcium supplements, phosphorus and magnesium among others; make the a stream of pee more concentrated (has more color because it has less water) or more diluted (less color, because it has more water). The kidneys also remove the acidic that are formed from the decomposition of the nutrients in this way control the acidity of the body.

The kidneys produce a hormone with assorted jobs. Three of the functions of these hormones are: Through the kidney renin helps control blood pressure. The kidneys also exude erythropoietin, the hormone in charge of stimulating production of red blood cells, so the decrease or absence of this hormone inevitably triggers anemia. Inside the renal, which is activated supplement D, which allows the absorption of calcium and phosphorus in the intestinal tract, which is necessary for bone mineralization.

Stage 3 of Chronic Kidney Disease

Other symptoms may include tiredness, metallic taste in mouth, pain in the side and trouble concentrating. Here is a chart indicating the stages of kidney disease, Slight kidney damage with normal or increased filtration – GFR more than 90, Mild decrease in kidney function – GFR between 60 – 89, Moderate decrease in kidney function – GFR between 30 – 59, Severe decrease in kidney function – GFR between 15 -29, Kidney failure requiring dialysis or transplantation – GFR less than 15.

Signs Of Kidney Failure Mayo Clinic

Some herbal medicines, have been associated with a higher risk of CKD, which is why you should never self prescribe these medications. If you already have a disease that can cause chronic kidney damage, make sure you follow your doctor’s prescribed treatment program. You should also have your kidney function checked regularly if you have a contributing disease.

I hope that you will be a lot more diligent about the types of foods you eat on a daily basis. Sure, it’s not going to be easy to lose a large amount of weight, and it certainly won’t happen overnight, but when you consider all of the serious health issues that goes along with being overweight, it should motivate you to take steps towards changing your life for the better.

Before we delve a little deeper, let’s get some basic information about kidney disease. Who gets kidney disease?. Although most people with diabetes are likely to have kidney disease, other factors such as genetics, blood pressure and blood sugar control do also play a role. So, the better a person keeps blood pressure and diabetes under control, the lower the chances of kidney disease developing.

Diabetes accounts for over 40 percent of the cases of kidney disease. So it’s clear that one of the primary ways to prevent kidney disease is to prevent diabetes. Or, if you already have it, effective treatment can reduce the impact that the condition has on your kidneys.

There are many things that lead to kidney failure. High blood pressure, diabetes, lupus, genetics and kidney stones, to name a few. Kidney problems will lead to chronic kidney or renal failure, if left untreated.

Over 500,000 Australians a year seek advice from their doctors regarding kidney disease and urinary tract infections. One in seven Australian adults suffers some sign of chronic kidney disease and one in 35 really suffers critical kidney disease. Throughout their lifetime, one-third of women and one in ten men experience a bladder infection and one in 15 women will have kidney stones.

Signs Of Kidney Failure High Blood Pressure

However, before it comes to that, increased awareness of kidney disorders and prevention methods should be priorities.

Diabetes and Hypertension: The 2 main causes for kidney disease are Diabetes and Hypertension (high blood pressure). Take charge and monitor these two very closely. If these 2 are left alone, things may get out of control sooner than you think. Diabetes will also start to impact your eye sight. Speak with your doctor and learn how these 2 can be kept under control.

Most of the time chronic kidney disease is caused by one of two things: high blood pressure or diabetes. When sugar levels are too high, as in diabetes, organs including the kidneys can be damaged. High blood pressure, or hypertension, is caused by too much pressure on the blood vessels.

If dialysis is not an option and there is a matching kidney donor, a transplant may be an option. Usually the original kidneys are left in place and a working kidney is implanted. The kidney donation may be from a living donor or a cadaver with matching blood and tissue types.

For instance, those who have kidney failure plus diabetes or high blood pressure must use alternative treatments for kidney disease and prescribed drugs.

They are an essential part of your urinary system. Kidneys filter your blood and remove water soluble wastes which are sent to your bladder. While producing urine, the kidneys also excrete wastes such as urea and ammonium.

Early detection is key to managing chronic kidney disease. Physicians use three tests to diagnosis this disease, blood pressure, serum creatinine and urine albumin. If it is diagnosed early on it may be controlled by diet and other small changes in health habits. If managed correctly treatments such as dialysis can be avoided or at least delayed.

Kidney Disease Jobs

Perhaps the best news that nephrology has to offer kidney patients is the fact that proven renal diets can be used as an adjunct to pre-dialysis and pre-transplantation treatment through adequately low protein diet, hypertension, anemia and diabetes.

Generally, not anyone who has diabetes contracts kidney disease. This is just another common misconception relating to the illness. While it is true that uncontrolled hyperglycemia can cause kidney disease, diabetics who maintain their appropriate blood glucose levels can avoid developing kidney failure.

The two most common causes of CKD are, diabetes (both types 1 and 2), and high blood pressure, Other causes of CKD include chronic viral illnesses (such as HIV/AIDS and hepatitis B and C), urinary tract infections within the kidneys themselves, inflammation following a strep infection, congenital defects, toxins, some medical drugs, and the use of recreational drugs that are injected. You can also damage your kidneys by eating too much animal protein and not drinking enough water.

If you overuse pain killers like aspirin, acetaminophen or ibuprofen, discontinue their use and ask your doctor what you can take instead. Keep informed about current treatments and procedures that can help keep your kidneys healthy and functioning for years to come.

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